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Knooking

get Knooking If you're a fan of knitting and crochet chances are you'll love knooking!

  • What is Knooking?

    The name comes from a combination of ‘hook’ and ‘knitting’, because, effectively, you are crocheting your knitting! With a special hook, known as a Knook, you create actual knitted stitches. It is the new knitting with a hook, hence the name "knook" or "knooking” - and you can knook virtually anything. Veronika Hug, author of ‘Knooking - 19 projects to knit with a crochet hook’ (Search Press), said: “I have tried everything that you could possibly knook, and, trust me, you really can do anything!”

    The beauty of the knook...

    A Knook is a specially-designed hook which has a crochet hook at one end and an eye at the other (for threading yarn). The knook helps you create knitted fabric, without the worry of dropping stitches, as can be encountered with regular knitting. Using a knook with an attached cord completely prevents dropped stitches, so it’s great for beginners!

  • get Knooking examples

New to Knooking?

  • Introduction to Knooking & The Garter Stitch

  • The Pearl Stitch

  • The Cable Stitch

Guide to Knooking Stitches

  • Chain Stitch

  • Insert the hook in the stitch, yarn around hook, and draw through the loop on the hook

  • Slip Stitch

  • Insert the hook in the stitch, yarn around hook and draw through one loop. Draw the yarn through both loops on the hook.

  • Single Crochet (UK double)

  • Insert the hook in the stitch, yarn around hook and draw through one loop. Draw the yarn through both loops on the hook.

  • Half Double (UK half treble)

  • Yarn around hook and insert in stitch. Draw the yarn through the stitch. Draw the yarn through again and pull through all three loops on the hook.

  • Double (UK treble)

  • Yarn around hook, insert in stitch and draw yarn through. Yarn around hook and draw through the first two loops, yarn around hook again and draw through the two remaining loops.

  • Decreasing stitches together

  • Single crochet (UK double): insert the hook in the stitch and draw the yarn through. Insert the hook in the next stitch and again draw the yarn through. Draw the yarn through again through all three loops.

  • Several stitches in one stitch

  • To increase stitches, work the required number of stitches into the same stitch.

  • Kitchener stitch

  • Place items together with the front facing up. Take up one stitch of the top piece with the hook and draw the yarn through. Take up the same stitch on the other piece and draw the yarn through.

  • Saddle stitch

  • Insert the hook from back to front through both pieces, work one stitch back to the right (backstitch), move hook to the left on the wrong side and push through in front of the last exit point. Work the back stitch of the following stitches into the previous exit point. With the following stitches, insert the needle in the back stitch of the previous exit point.

  • Weaving fringes

  • Cut yarn to length (length of fringe x 2 + 1cm/3/8 in for the knot). Insert the crochet hook through a stitch, catch threads in the middle and draw through in a loop. Take the threads from right to left and draw through the loop. Tie a knot.

  • Pompom

  • Cut two cardboard circles of the desired diameter. Cut a hole in the middle and place the two circles together. Thread the yarn on a wool needle and feed through the middle, and wind loosely, but densely around the ring.

  • Pompom 2

  • Cut two cardboard circles of the desired diameter. Cut a hole in the middle and place the two circles together. Thread the yarn on a wool needle and feed through Cut through the threads around the outer edge, and pry the rings slightly apart. Tie a double length of yarn tightly between the cardboard rings and knot securely. Carefully remove the cardboard.