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Cardmaking Techniques

So you've created cards upon cards full of stamped designs, printable elements and embellishments, and you fancy a new challenge. But where should you go from here? We've created a list of techniques to help you decide where to go next.

Embossing

Embossing

The process of creating raised designs and patterns in a material, such as paper, using embossing folders and an embossing machine. Please see our Embossing Guide for more information.

Embossing (Dry)

Embossing (Dry)

Also known as relief embossing, this is the process of tracing a brass stencil with a stylus tool to form raised designs in a material.

Embossing (Wet)

Embossing (Wet)

This technique involves using ink and stamps with some embossing powder and a heat tool. Simply ink the image, stamp down, sprinkle on the powder, shake off the excess, and heat from above.

Masking

Masking

Masking allows you to create montages by building up layers of stamped images, using paper cut-outs to cover the parts you want to leave as they are. The end result sees multiple images stamped on top of one another, without overlapping.

Matting and Layering

Matting and Layering

This technique is quite simply building up an image onto multiple larger pieces of card or paper, each layer slightly bigger than the last, to create extra dimension.

Paper Piecing

Paper Piecing

This is the process of taking a design, cutting it down into smaller sections and then layering the separate elements onto a piece of paper or card.

Sponging

Sponging

Adding texture to a background or design by dipping various sponges into paints or inks and dabbing onto your material with different pressures, for a lighter or darker shade.

Stencilling

Stencilling

Creating an image by applying colour through a stencil, replicating the stencil's image onto your desired material.

Stippling

Stippling

This technique allows you to mark your material with many small contiguous dots and flicks in varying degrees of pressure, creating a variety of shades as you go.

 

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